Fitbit Charge 3 review

Fitbit Charge 3 Review 2019 : Fitness Tracker and Heart Rate

Fitbit Charge 3 review

It has been years since Fitbit released its last Charge device, way back in September 2016. When it hit the shelves, the Fitbit Charge 2 added a host of fresh features to the smarts we’d seen before on the Fitbit Charge HR, the Fitbit Alta and the Fitbit Blaze.

But since then, we’ve seen the arrival of some much more innovative Fitbit devices, such as the Fitbit Ionic and the Fitbit Versa, both of which tout some rather impressive tracking features and GPS.

What’s New

  • Bigger touchscreen display: The Charge 3’s responsive screen is 30 percent bigger than the Charge 2’s, which makes viewing information a lot easier.
  • 7-day battery life: You can easily sail through a week on a charge, even with daily workouts.
  • Swim-tracking arrives: The Charge 3 is water-resistant, unlike its predecessors, so it can track pool workouts.
  • Connected GPS: The Charge 3 quickly latches on to your phone’s GPS, but built-in antennas would be more convenient.
  • New sensor for sleep insights: An SpO2 sensor will be used to alert users enrolled in the Fitbit Sleep Score Beta program if they experience breathing disturbances. That program starts in November.

Design and display

The Fitbit Charge 3 has the same rectangular screen and band design as seen on its predecessor, the Charge 2, but the design has been refined and tweaked somewhat.

One thing to note however is that there aren’t any pressable buttons on the Charge 3. That’s because this one has a full touchscreen rather than the tap to cycle screen we saw on the Charge 2, meaning you’ll do most of your navigating around its features with your finger on the display.

Better

The Charge 3 has far better battery life. It’s rated up to a week, according to Fitbit, but I found I was sometimes able to squeeze even a bit more out of it. Either way, though, it’s hard to overstate just how much of a difference this makes. One of the reasons I prefer fitness trackers over full-on smartwatches is precisely because having to remember to charge on a daily basis is a huge pain particularly if you like to use your device to track your sleep at night.

Fitness and health still come first

The Charge 3, you can set specific goals for these exercises, like running a certain distance or lifting weights for a specific amount of time. When you reach the goal, the Fitbit vibrates and displays a little animation to celebrate you reaching your goal.

The Charge 3 is also waterproof, so you can use it to record your swims or take it along for a run or bike ride in the rain.

On the health side, the Charge 3 comes with newly improved sleep tracking features. The tracker approximates your bedtime, wake-up time, and the various stages of your sleep cycle based on your heart rate and movement throughout the night. All this is broken down into a graph in the Fitbit app where you can see your sleep cycle over the course of each night.

Features

Like other recent Fitbits, the Charge 3 also tries to incorporate some smartwatch-like features. You’ll get calls, text messages, and some other notifications pushed to your wrist. It’s a convenient way to check your messages at a glance, or quickly accept or reject a call, but most of the notifications aren’t terribly useful because you can’t actually do anything once you receive them, especially if you have an iPhone.

If you have an Android phone, the picture is a little better: You can use quick replies to send brief, preset responses. You can also change up the watch face in the Fitbit app, which is a nice option but still a bit clunky.

PROS:CONS:
7 day battery life No automatic run pausing at launch
Touchscreen display No on board GPS
SpO2 sensor’s sleep analysis potential Not the most accurate heart rate
Swim proof

 VERDICT

The Fitbit Charge 3 is quite the improvement over the Charge 2, but you should only upgrade if you’re after a more slick, lightweight design, a slightly larger display and a few new fitness tracking features.

Mobvoi TicWatch S2

Mobvoi TicWatch S2:Easy on the wrist and wallet!

What is the Mobvoi TicWatch S2 ?

Launched alongside the Mobvoi TicWatch S2, the TicWatch S2 is the slightly sportier variant. Both watches are the respective follow-ups to last year’s TicWatch S and TicWatch E.

The Mobvoi TicWatch S2 is now water-resistant to 5-ATM, letting you safely take the device to a depth of 50 metres, plus it sports a much more attractive design than the TicWatch S.

Otherwise, the feature set between the Mobvoi TicWatch S2 and TicWatch E2 is identical, so you’re getting a budget-friendly smartwatch that hits the right notes.

Design

Like the TicWatch S before it, the TicWatch S2 is a smartwatch that skews towards the larger devices on the market. But while it’s bulky at just shy of 13mm in thickness, it carries its weight well. That’s important for any watch you might want to wear whilst out on a run.

Its polycarbonate build helps it to remain lightweight, all things considered. In addition, its build quality feels like a step up from the TicWatch S’ plastic-feeling construction. The TicWatch S2 is a lot hardier than the E2, with a MIL-STD-810G rating for durability and ruggedness as defined by the U.S. Military. Needless to say, it should hold up to some tough conditions.

Its design has been refined elsewhere, too. The TicWatch S’ slightly garish-looking bright green chronograph numbering around the screen’s bezel has now been replaced by a more subtle engraving. It doesn’t really serve any function without the bonus of a rotating bezel, but it’s now less distracting, especially when you’re able to change the watch face to all manner of sports-friendly options.

Like the TicWatch E2, the single hardware button has been moved to the right of the display. In the previous generation, it sat on the left, which always felt a little strange. Thankfully, the button here is also easier to actually press compared to the recessed button on the original TicWatch S.
On the rear of the TicWatch S2 is a heart rate monitor and magnetic charging pins identical to those used by the TicWatch E2.

Handily, the TicWatch S2 now accepts standard 22mm straps, meaning you can swap out for some that better suit your tastes. The previous TicWatch S used proprietary straps due to the GPS antenna being built into the band itself.

The TicWatch S2 comes with a silicone strap. It offers a good amount of stretch and is therefore comfortable to wear throughout the day. The silicone also stands up well to sweat and moisture, so perfect for wear whilst on a run or swim.

Screen

The Mobvoi TicWatch S2 has a 1.39-inch fully circular, 400 x 400 resolution AMOLED display. That’s a decently sharp screen for a smartwatch at this price. Yes, you’ll spot pixels if you’re peering at the panel up-close, but day-to-day it isn’t something you’ll notice.

The screen displays vibrant colours and is bright enough to see outdoors, even on a sunny winter’s day. However, lacking an ambient light sensor, you’ll have to adjust the brightness manually.

There’s an always-on display mode, which shows basic time and other complications even when the watch isn’t in use. That’s a bonus over the likes of the Apple Watch, which doesn’t show anything. This does have some impact on its battery life, however.

The wake gesture of rotating your wrist is now a far more consistent compared to the TicWatch S, which was one of my previous frustrations.

Software and features

The Mobvoi TicWatch S2 has pretty standard specifications for a Wear OS smartwatch released in the past year. There’s a Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 2100 chip alongside 512MB of RAM and 4GB of storage. That’s the same as the TicWatch E2. Again, it’s a shame that Mobvoi (the maker of the TicWatch) hasn’t waited for the Snapdragon Wear 3100 chip to be more affordable, but this could have seen quite a delay.

Performance is what you’d expect for a smartwatch with these internals. Apps fire up as swiftly as I’d expect – which is to say that it’s a chipset that’s beginning to show its age slightly but is otherwise responsive enough. Bringing up Google Assistant can sometimes be a little slow; it isn’t always immediately obvious if the voice assistant has heard your request since there can be a delay before it springs to life with a response.

The TicWatch S2 runs the latest Wear OS, which means the refinements to the UI are present. Notifications are better presented and now come with improved quick-reply options for any incoming messages from WhatsApp, for example.

The one feature that still missing is NFC. Without an onboard NFC chip, there’s no Google Pay support for contactless payments. One of the best use cases for a smartwatch is the first time you pay for something just by tapping your watch against the payment terminal. Considering the TicWatch S2 is fractionally more expensive than the TicWatch E2, the absence feels more prominent here.

Fitness tracking

The TicWatch S2 has built-in GPS and GLONASS support (alongside a few other satellite standards), which is ideal for anyone looking for more accurate tracking data during their outdoor workouts.

Disappointingly, there’s no altimeter inside, so the TicWatch S2 can’t track your elevation data. This is useful not only for workouts – being able to understand your pace dropped or heart rate increased because of a steep incline, for example – but also for everyday activity tracking.

Many Fitbits use an altimeter to track how many flights of stairs you climb and let you set a floor goal. Features such as this can help promote healthier habits, encouraging you to take the stairs instead of the lift.

The watch’s GPS performance was identical to the TicWatch E2, which is to say it isn’t quite on the money when it comes to distance and pace, but still good overall. It can get a satellite lock relatively quickly, typically within 30 seconds, so you’re not held up too long before you’re able to set off.

Considering this is the sports option, extra physical buttons for greater differentiation from the TicWatch E2’s design would have been desirable. It’s easier to hit a button whilst running to pause a workout or toggle between different metrics than swipe or prod at a touchscreen. It’s worse when trying to use a touchscreen in a swimming pool.

Battery life

The TicWatch S2 has a 415mAh battery inside, which will typically last around 36 hours before requiring a top up. Although not bad, it isn’t as good as an Apple Watch Series 4 or a Huawei Watch 2, which both get much closer to that 48-hour mark. This is with general use, with the always-on display turned on.

GPS is the biggest culprit in depleting any smartwatch battery, and here you’ll see about 10% loss after 30 minutes of tracking. So for any big runs, expect to have to top up the battery within a day.

The charging mechanism has greatly improved over the original generation TicWatch S. It’s now a big puck-shaped magnetic dock that clips onto the back of the watch and holds firmly in place. In the previous device, it was attached only to the pins on the side and would always come off.

Pros

  • Big display
  • Reasonable battery life
  • Rugged build quality

Cons

  • No altimeter
  • No sleep tracking
  • Would have benefited from

Verdict

Mobvoi TicWatch S2 smartwatch doesn’t quite live up to its sporty ambitions, but it’s still great value overall.

Huawei Watch 2 Sport : The best Android smartwatch

Huawei Watch 2 Sport – user opinions and reviews

The original Huawei Watch is one of the most popular Android Wear devices to date, and for good reason. While it may be a tad on the chunky side, users flocked to the Huawei Watch because of its classy design and solid performance.

Design & Build

In terms of design, the Sport variant of the Huawei Watch 2 is quite a step away from the fashion focused first-generation Huawei Watch – although that’s not to say it’s not an attractive wearable. Gone is the silver stainless steel body of a traditional watch, as the Huawei Watch 2 boasts a rather generic sporty smartwatch design, complete with a plastic body and a double chrome design.

In terms of dimensions, the circular display of the Watch 2 is fairly large at 1.2in with only one case size available (45mm), meaning it may look a little bulky and awkward on smaller wrists – especially with a height of 12.6mm. It’s also fairly heavy at 57g – for comparison, the second-generation Apple Watch measures in at 45g.

Huawei claims that the ceramic bezel used on the Watch 2 is six times harder than stainless steel, making it resistant to abrasion whilst still being relatively lightweight. While we were initially concerned that the mirror-finish bezels would be prone to light scratches, we can confirm that after five weeks of wear, it’s still scratch-free.

The lugs are also lower than other smartwatches available on the market, and this provides a more comfortable fit around the wrist. It’s not the only benefit either, as it also provides better stability to the watch during heartrate monitoring (especially when moving quickly during exercise).

In terms of colour options, Huawei offers the Watch 2 in three colours: Dynamic Orange, Carbon Black and Concrete Grey. The latter two are fairly similar in look, although with a key difference: the Concrete Grey Huawei Watch 2 has silver buttons, while the Carbon Black variant has black buttons. The Dynamic Orange colour option is also exclusive to the 4G variant of the Huawei Watch 2.

While admittedly the colour options aren’t as ‘out there’ as what is offered with the Huawei P10, the Watch 2 straps can be swapped out for any standard 20mm watch strap, allowing for limited customisation.

Overall, the build quality of the Huawei Watch 2 is around what is expected of a £330 smartwatch. Despite featuring a plastic body compared to the stainless steel first-generation Watch, the mirror-like double-chrome design provides a more premium look than other fitness-focused smartwatches. The lowered lugs also make a huge difference in comfort, especially when worn over long periods.

Core specs

Inside the second-generation Huawei Watch is a quad-core Snapdragon Wear 2100 processor with 768MB of RAM. The Wear 2100 brings various improvements over the Snapdragon 400 used in older smartwatches beyond a speed bump, including improved battery life and a smaller design.

In use, the Watch is responsive to the touch with no signs of lag when navigating between menus, swiping between notifications or running third-party apps.

As part of the standalone nature, the Watch 2 features 4GB of storage that can be used to store music. Alternatively, the Watch 2 comes with Google Play Music support, and even offers users a two-month free trial to the service when they buy the Watch, allowing users to browse and download music to the Watch on the go.

Screen

In terms of the screen, the Huawei Watch 2 features a 1.2in circular AMOLED display with a 390 x 390 resolution, equating to around 326ppi. While the resolution is nothing to be sniffed at, it can’t quite compete with the 480 x 480 resolution of the LG Watch Sport – and it shows. Not all watch faces are as well defined as we’d like, although it’s a small issue that only the more eagle-eyed amongst you will notice in day-to-day use.

Aside from the issues with resolution, we thought the Huawei Watch 2’s AMOLED display was bright and vibrant, with no complaints with use even in direct sunlight.

Fitness

So, what can the Huawei Watch 2 offer that the original didn’t? Like many other smartwatches, the Watch 2 has a heavy focus on fitness, and aims to be your fitness companion, offering helpful stats and professional fitness advice.

While the Watch 2 features preset exercises (cardio, fat burn, bike ride, etc) that you can select on-the-fly, you can also use the Huawei Health app on your smartphone to create your own custom workout plans based on your goals. It’ll coach you during your exercise, giving you stage guidance (warm up, high intensity, low intensity, etc), speed guidance, lap reminders and of course, goal process reminders and more.

The Watch 2 boasts a heart rate monitor that provides a real-time heart rate zone to keep your heart rate in check while exercising, as, contrary to popular belief, having a high heart rate can have a negative effect on your workout. If your heart rate is too high during your workout, the Watch 2 will let you know.

It doesn’t stop there though, as it also offers in-depth stats following your workout, available on your smartphone. It’ll break your workout into different areas, offer post-workout reports for VO2Max, training effect evaluations (for long term comparison) and recovery time advice depending on how hard you’ve pushed yourself.

Don’t worry about sweat damaging the smartwatch either: the Huawei Watch 2 offers IP68 dust and water resistance, meaning it should survive for up to 1m of water for 30 minutes.

Our only annoyance? It doesn’t make any attempt to automatically detect fitness activities. While this may not affect those that plan on going for a run or a bike ride, it means that those who take walks that turn into brisk exercise and forget to turn on the walking activity on the Watch miss out on all that data.

Equally, we found that on occasion we’d forget to end the tracking on the Watch and that it’d still be tracking us hours later – not good for our battery life or our health data.

Connectivity

The Huawei Watch 2 features not only a built-in heart rate monitor, but also GPS, Wi-Fi (802.11 b/g/n), Bluetooth 4.1 and optional 4G connectivity, allowing for standalone use.

This means that you can use the Watch for exercise and even to make and receive calls without your smartphone being in range. It’s worth mentioning that the 4G connectivity is exclusive to the Sport variant, and isn’t available as part of the Classic range.

In terms of sensors, the Huawei Watch 2 boasts an accelerometer, three-axis gyroscope, barometer, compass and a capacitive sensor in addition to the HR monitor mentioned above.

Battery life

In terms of battery life, Huawei claims that the 4G-connected Watch 2 will last for two days on a single charge, while the non-4G variant will last an extra day with a three-day battery life with average use (both feature the same 420mAh battery).

While we can’t confirm the battery life of the 4G-connected Watch, we can say that the standard Huawei Watch 2 lasts around two days on a single charge – it’s only when we toggle on the smart power saving mode that we see three-day battery life.

There’s also a Watch Mode for those that only want to use the smartwatch to tell the time. While it disables most of the functionality of the Watch, it also allows it to be powered on for a whopping 30 days on a single charge.

Huawei claims that if everything is in use constantly (GPS, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, 4G connectivity) like when using it to track workouts, the Watch 2 will reportedly last 11 hours before needing some juice.

The good news is that when the time does come to charge the Huawei Watch 2, it’s pretty fast: we found that it would charge from empty to full in little over an hour.

 Software and apps

In terms of software, the Huawei Watch 2 boasts Android Wear 2.0. It’s a huge improvement over the original Android Wear, providing a more intuitive and easy-to-use user interface.

Due to the standalone capabilities offered by the new version of Android Wear, the Huawei Watch 2 features its own built-in Play Store for users to browse and download apps directly to the Watch without the need for a paired smartphone.

While there are a handful of apps for Android Wear that allow for standalone use, many (at the time of writing) still require a connected smartphone to work. While Google Play Music can stream music to the smartwatch via Wi-Fi only, Spotify requires a smartphone to be connected for playback.

Of course, the Huawei Watch 2 also includes Google Assistant support, with users able to long press one of the two buttons on the Watch 2 to activate it. It’s quicker and more responsive than on older smartwatches we’ve used, making it a decent option for text input when replying to texts and emails. For those that don’t enjoy dictation, you can swipe on-screen using the new keyboard.

Pros

  • Android Wear 2.0 is a big improvement
  • Watch Mode offers 25-day battery life
  • Optional 4G model

cons

  • Small display
  • No rotating crown
  • Inaccurate fitness sensors
  • Design less premium than predecessor
  • Workout data doesn’t currently sync
Skagen Falster Smartwatch

Skagen Falster Smartwatch Review: Could be so much better

 

Does Skagen make the best looking smartwatch?

Skagen aims to change that, though, with their hybrid and smartwatches that still uphold the classic Skagen look and design. Skagen, by the way, is owned by Fossil, so they’ve been making watches for quite some time and they have some experience with hybrid watches as well.

Design

Skagen is a subsidiary of Fossil, and its watches have a less aggressive, perhaps less overtly masculine, look than most of the Fossil-branded devices.

The Skagen Falster’s case is stainless steel, with a just-off-black finish. A recognisable tube of metal pokes out of the face to hold the straps in place. This timepiece has more designer gloss than most Wear OS watches, but it isn’t particularly attention grabbing.

From a tech perspective, the design is a little less impressive. The Falster’s bezel is large, and there’s more border between the start of the display glass and the screen panel itself. There’s 5mm between the screen and the watch’s border.

Comfort is great, however. The Skagen Falster comes with a high-quality soft-leather strap that rotates freely around the securing bars. And while you might not guess this from the design, the strap is easy to replace too.

The bar appears to run through the strap, but the central part is actually separate. As such, you can swap out the leather strap for any one of the nylon, silicone and steel mesh straps available – although I can’t imagine any of them are as comfortable as the default leather.

Since the Skagen Falster is lacking a heart rate sensor, there’s no need to wear the device particularly tight around your wrist.

Control and display

Skagen hasn’t tried anything interesting with the Falster’s operation. It has a touchscreen and a single button on the side.

This button looks and feels like a proper watch crown; it even rotates. However, it has no functionality, which seems a shame. Like the thick-bezel face.

Its screen is fully round, with no design-spoiling cut-outs as seen in earlier Moto watches. The panel is OLED, too, like the Apple Watch’s screen. It’s roughly 1.4 inches across, but there are no details available regarding its resolution. Skagen has even gone as far as to block screenshots in the Wear OS app, to discourage snooping to find out.

Looking up close there is a smidge of OLED fizz, but it won’t be noticeable from a normal distance. The only real criticism I have is that you don’t get one of the top-most benefits of OLED in a watch – that the display should be able to merge with a black surround. Instead, it appears ever-so-slightly blue-ish in a well-lit room.

This is likely because there are slight gaps between the display layers, which reflect just a little light. In a dark room, the Falster screen does have that “perfect black” OLED look, though.

Wear OS and features

The Skagen Falster runs Wear OS and has no added apps. You get Wear OS more-or-less as it ships, aside from a selection of Skagen clock faces. There’s nothing too bold in this selection.

Skagen doesn’t try to make digital watch faces that look like real diver’s watches, or ones dripping in colour or bold textures. If the watch did have these, they’d seem completely at odds with the hardware design.

Instead, the Falster has spare, mostly monochrome watch faces. There are digital and analogue ones, and a couple that try to fit in almost an unwise amount of information on-screen.

Given the slick hardware, I’m actually slightly disappointed by the clock face designs. None are particularly stylish to my eyes. If I was to continue using the Falster long-term, I’d probably consider getting hold of a third-party face watch. Of course, this is extremely easy to do with a Wear OS watch.

The Falster has a Snapdragon Wear 2100 CPU, present in plenty of Wear watches including the Asus ZenWatch 3, Fossil Q and LG G Watch Style. The software runs just fine.

Wear OS can still feel a little fiddly at times, and doesn’t have the reaction speed of a great phone running Android 8.0, but no smartwatch system is perfect.

The issue is the Skagen Falster doesn’t make full use of the potential of Android Wear, because it doesn’t have all that many features.

First, there’s no NFC, which enables wireless payments in other watches. There’s no GPS, either, so you can’t track runs, hikes or bike rides without your phone. There isn’t even a heart rate sensor, making the Skagen Falster only as adept as the most basic Fitbit for fitness tracking until you engage an app.

Some Wear apps let your watch act as a second screen for the phone, which will make it seem like a full fitness watch even if your mobile is doing all the work.

A microphone is the one extra that Falster does include, allowing you to use Google Assistant.

Fitness tracking

Still want to use the Falster for fitness tracking? On its own it relies entirely on the internal accelerometer, meaning it can count steps – but that’s it.

With the help of a third-party app or two you can use it as a rep counter for the gym, or perhaps a yoga guide. The Falster is a poor option for runners or cyclists, but in the gym it fares a little better.

However, those wanting to track how hard they’ve worked will definitely want a heart rate sensor, which is missing here.

Battery life

Despite an almost universal lack of advanced features, the Skagen doesn’t last particularly long between charges.

Since it isn’t much use for exercise tracking, I’ve probably used it less than most other Wear watches. Even so, it still only manages a day between charges.

This issue is compounded by slow charging. The Falster takes several hours to recharge. This more-or-less rules it out for sleep tracking, if you want to wear it during the day as your normal watch.

The charger is a wireless pad that transmits charge through the backplate. It’s fiddly to use as well as slow, however. The Falster can slip off it too easily, since the magnetic force that keeps it in place just isn’t strong enough to maintain a fix.

Pros

– Great looks
– Comfortable leather strap

Cons

– Limited features
– Poor battery life

Samsung Galaxy Watch

Samsung Galaxy Watch review : the perfect companion for Android phones

Best option for Android smartphone users

Samsung Galaxy Watch : The Ultimate Multi-Day Wearable

There are a plenty of smartwatches in the market but most of them lack in one department or the other. Surprisingly, Samsung’s Galaxy Watch ticks all the right boxes. It has got great looks, pairs instantly, fetches notifications in real time, is accurate with workout tracking and comes with a lasting battery.

Specs

The Galaxy Watch comes in two sizes – for the first time, from Samsung. There is a 42mm model and then a 46mm model. The two are largely the same, spec-wise, aside from the usual display size and battery capacity. The 42mm sports a 1.2-inch display, while the 46mm has a 1.3-inch display, both of which are 360×360 resolution and are Super AMOLED panels. These are protected by Corning’s Gorilla Glass DX+ as well. On the battery capacity, there is a 270mAh and the 46mm has a 472mAh capacity battery. As you can see there are some pretty big differences there, and Samsung claims battery life is three days and four days, respectively.

Samsung is using an unnamed Exynos processor that is a quad-core chipset and clocked at 1.15GHz for these watches. There is also 768MB of RAM, with 4GB of storage (about 1.5GB available out of the box). Only 2.4GHz WiFi is supported here, so that’s a/b/g/n and not ac. There is also support for Bluetooth 4.2 along with using GPS and GLONASS for location tracking. Samsung has also filled the Galaxy Watch with a slew of sensors here. There’s a heart rate sensor of course, as well as Accelerometer, Barometer, Gyro Sensor, and a Light Sensor.

The straps on the Galaxy Watch are interchangeable, and in the box, you get a silicon strap that will vary based on the color Galaxy Watch you pick up. For the 42mm model, it uses 20mm watch straps, and the 46mm is compatible with 22mm watch straps. So you can replace them with any other watch strap you want.

Setup

Setting up the Galaxy Watch is pretty simple, as you might expect. Simply download the Galaxy Wearable app (formerly Samsung Gear) from the Google Play Store. If you have a Samsung smartphone, it should already be pre-installed. From there, you will follow the instructions on the screen to pair it with your phone and get it all setup. It’s really quite easy, and only takes a few minutes. Now one of the cooler features here is that you can restore your watch from an earlier watch (so if you have the Gear S3 and you are upgrading to the Galaxy Watch this would come in handy). It will bring back all of your apps, settings, accounts and everything. Making it super simple to switch from an earlier Samsung smartwatch.

Hardware

The Galaxy Watch really doesn’t look a whole lot different from the Gear S3 that was released two years ago, and that’s not a big surprise. There’s really not a whole lot of design changes you can make with a watch, compared to a smartphone. It still sports the rotating bezel, which makes it super easy to navigate through the OS (it’s still pretty surprising that no other smartwatch has done this yet). There are two buttons on the right-hand side of the watch, one for back and the other for home or the apps screen. On the bottom of the watch, you’ll find a slew of sensors including the wireless charging sensors. It’s definitely nice that Samsung is keeping Qi Wireless charging instead of opting for its own wireless charging standard. And that’s really about it for the hardware.

Now the Galaxy Watch is definitely a big watch, and there’s no getting around that. Coming from someone that has been wearing the Fitbit Versa for many months, the Galaxy Watch was much bigger and after wearing it for a week and going back to the Versa, I almost forgot I was wearing it. Now the reason for the Galaxy Watch being so big (mostly thick) is for that larger capacity battery. It does have that 472mAh capacity battery, which is the largest that Samsung has included in a smartwatch so far. That’s part of what makes this a very big, and thick watch. And if you are one that has a smaller wrist, you’ll want to get the 42mm model, or at least check out these smartwatches in-store before purchasing (they are on display at Best Buy in Samsung’s display area).

There’s really no complaints here about the hardware. The watch casing is metal, while the backside is plastic. The backside being plastic is not a big deal – and also not new. This is for wireless charging, as wireless charging works better through plastic than metal and glass. It also makes the watch a tiny bit lighter, while still keeping it nice and classy. Now the colors that Samsung has chosen this year are also pretty slick. There’s the silver model that has a black rotating bezel (this is the model we have) which is only available in the 46mm size. The 42mm size has the black and rose gold colors with matching straps.

Software

Tizen v4.0 is running on the Galaxy Watch, and that should be no surprise, since Samsung has been using Tizen on its smartwatches since it moved to the Gear moniker back in 2014. Tizen has actually come pretty far since then, and actually offers a better user experience than Google’s own WearOS. Tizen works pretty well on wearables, it is plenty fluid, and works really well on the Exynos chipset and 768MB of RAM that is included here. Now it does take up a fairly significant amount of space on the Galaxy Watch, but it is comparable to WearOS. However, the good thing here is that watch apps are pretty small in size, so that doesn’t make a huge deal. The area where it makes a big deal is when storing music offline on the watch. So keep in mind that you only have about 1.5GB of free space here.

Notifications on Tizen come in pretty timely, though there were a few that came in pretty late, which was surprising. This might be because the phone hadn’t been touched for a while and went into a deep sleep – causing notifications to be slower. When you receive messages on the Galaxy Watch, it’s pretty easy to reply to them. Samsung has a number of canned responses here, which include simple things like “OK” and such. But you can also use voice commands to reply, or the keyboard. The keyboard isn’t a full keyboard, which makes sense as those buttons would be pretty tiny on a 1.3-inch circular display. But instead, you can handwrite letters for your reply. It may sound like it’ll take forever to send a message, but after a while it becomes pretty easy to do. A lot of notifications still don’t work to well on the wrist. For example, if you get a mention on Twitter, all you can do is open it on your phone. you can’t reply to it from your wrist, but you can at least read it.

When you rotate the bezel from left to right, you’ll be greeted with a number of widgets that you can set up. These are customizable in the Galaxy Wearable app, and include things like Samsung Health, Weather, Stress measurements, and so much more. There are a ton that you can use here, and it makes it easy to quickly gather information without having to launch an app on your watch to find out how the weather is going to be today.

The software on the Galaxy Watch is pretty good. Tizen has really come a long way since the Gear S days, where it used to be pretty janky and slow. But Samsung has done a good job at optimizing the software – of course, having a wearable-optimized chipset inside likely helps a ton as well. Samsung hasn’t forgotten the little things either. If you are using an analog watch face here, you can actually hear the second hand ticking on the watch, to make it sound like a regular, old-fashioned watch. It’s not loud, you can actually barely hear it even with no other noise going on in the room. Which is a nice effect, that can be turned off if you don’t like that feature. Smartwatches in general can still use a ton of work, but Tizen is likely the best wearable operating system available.

Apps

The Galaxy Apps store is where you’ll find the apps for the Galaxy Watch. This is no different from previous Samsung smartwatches, but you will find that there aren’t all that many apps available. There are a lot of paid apps, which are not official apps of particular services. For example, there is an app to give you Google Maps directions, and it costs $0.99. This is not an official Google app, so it likely won’t work as well, which is unfortunate, but that’s the state of the app store for Galaxy Watch. There are a few pretty good apps to pick up and download on the watch, like ESPN, MapMyRun, Uber and Spotify. These will need their Android apps to be installed on the connected phone however.

With ESPN, you can check out the latest scores, as well as the latest news on your favorite teams which is neat. MapMyRun is able to track your run, even without your phone with you while you’re running. This is where the storing music offline can really come in handy. Uber of course will allow you to call an Uber without pulling out your phone. Now Spotify works off and on. When we had the Galaxy Watch connected to the Google Pixel 2 XL, it had problems connecting to Spotify, telling us our username and password were incorrect (when they weren’t), but it didn’t have that issue with the Galaxy Note 9. Spotify allows you to remotely control your music from your wrist, and you can also stream music over WiFi from your watch. The latter isn’t a feature I used too often, but it was nice that it was there. Spotify on Galaxy Watch could definitely use some help, and it likely will get some updates in the future, since the two companies announced this partnership for future Samsung devices.

Of course, we can’t forget about Samsung Pay. That is included on the Galaxy Watch as well. But there is a caveat here. This is Samsung Pay, NFC-only. There is no MST (Magnetic Secure Transmission) support here. The thought process, according to Samsung, for leaving it out, was to be able to add in more battery to the watch. And that is likely a good trade-off for many users. You can still use Samsung Pay here, but only on NFC terminals. Simply tap your watch on the terminal, and it’ll initiate the payment for you. It’s pretty simple, and it means you can be out running, and stop at a gas station for a bottle of water and not need your smartphone or your wallet. Now that is pretty cool, as long as that gas station has a NFC terminal.

The Galaxy Watch, like its other wearables, can also double as a fitness tracker. It is able to track your workouts, calories, steps taken and so much more. This is also a waterproof smartwatch now, and it can also track your swimming. That’s a feature that it brought over from the Gear Sport released last year. With Samsung Health, you can track just about everything you can imagine. Including many different workouts that Fitbit, Garmin and even Withings/Nokia Health, don’t support on their fitness trackers.

Since this is a Samsung wearable, Bixby is also here, and well it shouldn’t be. Bixby almost seems worse on the Galaxy Watch than it does on the Galaxy Note 9, and that’s pretty telling because it’s pretty bad on the Galaxy Note 9. Doing simple things like asking Bixby how the weather is, sometimes works and sometimes it doesn’t. Part of this might be the fact that Bixby isn’t great with deciphering you over background noise. That should, hopefully, change in the future though. If there was one sore spot of the Galaxy Watch, it would be Bixby. It’s unfortunate, but it’s just not ready to be on every single Samsung device just yet.

Battery Life & Connectivity

When it comes to connectivity, the Galaxy Watch had no real issues with staying connected to whichever phone we were using it with. We used it for about four days on the Pixel 2 XL and then about a week on the Galaxy Note 9. When at home, it would connect to our WiFi network and that would help the Galaxy Watch’s battery life last even longer which is nice. That’s a feature that Samsung added in with the Gear S3, and it’s good to see that it is still here.

With battery life, Samsung is touting four days on the 46mm model and three days on the 42mm model. Now we only have the 46mm model, so we can’t really talk much on the 42mm version, but we’ve heard from others that battery life is closer to two days instead of three. On the 46mm Galaxy Watch, the battery would last more than three days. We got to three days and nine hours with about 15-percent left on the Galaxy Watch, which it was estimated as having about eleven hours left. That’s pretty close to four days, and since that was at the end of the day, it likely could have made the full four days. That was without turning off any features, so you could likely get it to last even more than four days with battery saver and other things turned off. With the always-on display here, the battery life was basically cut in half. We’re talking less than two days. That’s expected since the display is always-on, obviously. But still pretty decent, compared to other smartwatches on the market today.

One of the major drawbacks and complaints that a lot of people have about smartwatches, is the fact you need to charge them every day. But that is beginning to change. The Galaxy Watch is able to last more than a day, and more than two days in most circumstances. It’s getting close to fitness tracker-level battery life, which is pretty impressive and also a good thing. The trade-off here, though, is having to deal with a much larger smartwatch. Which might be a bigger trade-off to some more than others.

Pros:

  • Available in Bluetooth and 4G LTE variants
  • Two sizes available
  • Almost four-day battery life
  • Interchangeable watch straps
  • Samsung Pay
  • Outstanding OLED display

Cons:

  • Bixby is still meh
  • No MST for Samsung Pay, only NFC
  • Not very comfortable to wear at night

Conclusion

The Galaxy Watch is a very compelling wearable; it seems to effectively check every box out there. From price and functionality to battery life and even product and service compatibility. The Galaxy Watch is compatible with all Android smartphones running Android 5.0 or later, and iPhone 5 or newer models of Apple’s iOS handsets. Which is pretty impressive to be quite honest, and its pricing is right in line with the Apple Watch. There are still things that Samsung could improve here, but this might be the best all-around smartwatch that is currently available.

APPLE WATCH SERIES 4

Apple Watch Series 4 Review and Buying Guide 2019

Apple’s latest smartwatch remains one of the best on the market

APPLE WATCH SERIES 4 

DESIGN AND FEEL

Instead of 38mm and 42mm heights, you have 40mm and 44mm versions, with bigger screens that nearly reach the edges (it’s very iPhone XS, just without the notch).

The Series 4 is also a tad thinner, meaning that the overall volume of the Watch has decreased. We have the 44mm version, which does feel a little different on the wrist compared to the 42mm Series 3.

The extra width and height is noticeable on a device you’re used to looking at day after day. On thinner wrists, it can tip it over into feeling maybe even too chunky. Given that the screen on the smaller 40mm model is actually larger than the one on the old bigger 42mm model, we think some people who previously went for the extra readability of the bigger screen might prefer to stick to the smaller model this time.

The change in thinness is only a tiny amount (not even a millimetre), but the new Watch does feel less hefty when you bend your wrist. We think Apple may have changed the curve of the Watch’s rear at the same time as thinning it, giving your skin a little more room to manouevre before it hits the case. The difference is subtle, but noticeable – this is good for sports.

As part of the changes to the back, the entire underside is now ceramic, instead of just the heart-rate sensor. This is great in terms of making it as hypoallergenic as possible, and with the new extremely sci-fi-styled heart sensor, looks pretty badass. Not that you’ll ever really see it. It feels the same as before – very comfortable.

Screen

Unlike the majority of other wearables on the market, the Apple Watch 4 retains the square display that debuted on the first-gen model. While not to everyone’s taste, we like it, and often find that circular smartwatches try too hard to mimic traditional mechanical watches and end up looking a bit odd. Nevertheless, while it’s not exactly edge-to-edge as some have claimed, it’s definitely more rounded than previous iterations, giving the impression of a more curved timepiece without losing the benefit of the square display.

Best of all, though, is that the Apple Watch 4’s OLED screen now comes in two new slightly larger sizes of 40mm and 44mm versus the 42mm and 38mm offerings of the third-gen device, making it more than 30 per cent larger, while still shrinking in thickness.

Strap and fit

We’ve been reviewing the 44mm Apple Watch with the standard silicon strap in space grey, which wraps around the wrist with a button clasp. It’s super smooth and comfortable, and above all else, it’s the same strap size as previous models, meaning those upgrading to the Series 4 won’t need to buy all new straps.

Set-up

Setting up the Apple Watch is incredibly easy, as long as you have an iPhone 6S (or newer) running iOS 12 (or later). Switch Bluetooth on, open the app, scan the face of the Apple Watch using your iPhone’s camera, and you’re pretty much done.

Your iPhone will then ask for a few details – such as your Apple ID, whether you’ll be wearing the Apple Watch on your left or right wrist, which apps you want to install on your smartwatch, and whether you want to set up a passcode – which you definitely should do.

After this, the two devices will sync – a process that took around two minutes during our attempt.

Software and new features

One of the biggest features Apple touted when it unveiled the Apple Watch Series 4 was the electrocardiogram feature (ECG), so you can regularly check on your ticker with the press of a button, without a visit to the hospital.

However, the feature isn’t even enabled in the US yet and it’ll be a while before it reaches the rest of the world, so we aren’t able to test it just yet.

The Series 4 also has some new sensor tech. Boasting a new gyroscope and accelerometer, these give the watch more sensitivity to track your activities precisely. An advantage of this means Apple has been able to introduce fall detection, which is enabled automatically if you’re aged 65 or older and will alert authorities if it detects you’ve fallen and haven’t moved since.

Fitness features

While we couldn’t really fully test most of the brand new features yet, we were able to put the watch through its paces when working out. A new fitness feature is the tracking of hiking and yoga in addition to the run, swim, bike, walk and the rest of them.

We gave the new yoga tracking a test at a class, and found it super simple to operate before and after exercise, being discreet during the workout so as not to disturb anyone else around us and also offering vital health data like heart rate and minutes elapsed. At the end of the workout, it’s really easy to select finish and you immediately get a rundown of how you performed, or in this case, how many calories were burnt during the elapsed workout time.

Performance and battery life

Under the hood, the Watch 4 comes with Apple’s new S4 chipset that sports a dual-core 64-bit processor and new GPU to be two times faster than the old S3 chip. So that means more effective data collection, including sucking up an accelerometer and gyroscopic info.

We’ve noticed no issues in terms of swiping through screens or firing open apps, as you’d expect from an Apple device. Everything is super fast and fluid. It’s really a delight to use.

However, while the feature-set on the watch has been vastly improved over the years, battery life is one thing that’s remained the same: at two days and a bit. After a day of using it perhaps far too much, the Apple Watch has used around half of its battery. One the days that we don’t use its features as much, we able to squeeze another half a day out of the watch.

Pros:

  • Larger display, slimmer chassis, gorgeous design, lightweight, smooth performance and navigation

Cons:

  • Pricey, battery life still only 2 days, won’t track sleep natively, no always-on display option

In short

All in all, the Apple Watch Series 4 is a very impressive bit of kit. Not only is it able to accurately track a host of workouts – being intuitive and a pleasure to use throughout – but it is also a beautiful and super premium lifestyle device. More and more popular iPhone apps are becoming available on the Watch, and we can’t wait to see what’s coming next.

All the negatives highlighted, such as the no always-on display option, the lack of sleep tracking and the high price-tag, aren’t huge negatives, and are more like little niggles.

It’d be hard to see how Apple improve on the Series 4, but we’re sure they will, somehow. For now though, it remains one of the best smartwatches on the market.

Smart Watch

How Much Does A Smart watch Cost | Best of 2019 Reviews

Best Smart Watch 2019 Reviews

The way to obtain the best smart watch in a saturated marketplace for your smart devices? A frequent question today asked by everybody who’s using android smart technician. The wear OS watched become popular in a very brief period of time.

Even though smartwatches have existed in the market for quite a long time. However, it became popular in masses with all the development in the subject of the android system. Android smartwatch is now a vital part of the Android smart devices for many races.

When It came to the pursuit for how to obtain the best smartwatch on the marketplace. It triggered an ignition of research and tests in my mind. I started scrutiny to learn the best android smart watch. My research took a while to learn the answers about wear OS watches.

And now I can suggest some nice and top of this list best smartwatches. It’s clear to state that android watch has its place among all of the wise devices. Let’s jump to the actual stuff to understand our answers.

Preview
Best Choice
Apple Watch Series 4 (GPS, 44mm) - Space Gray Aluminium Case with Black Sport Band
Samsung Galaxy Smartwatch (46mm) Silver (Bluetooth), SM-R800NZSAXAR - US Version with Warranty
Huawei Watch 2 Sport Smartwatch - Ceramic Bezel - Carbon Black Strap (US Warranty)
Best Price
Ticwatch S2, Waterproof Smartwatch with Build-in GPS for Outdoor Activities, Wear OS by Google, Compatible with Android and iOS (Midnight)
Fitbit Charge 3 Fitness Activity Tracker, Rose Gold/Blue Grey, One Size (S & L Bands Included)
Fitbit Blaze Smart Fitness Watch, Black, Silver, Small (5.5 -  6.7 inch) (US Version)
Product Name
Apple Watch Series 4 (GPS, 44mm) - Space Gray Aluminium Case with Black Sport Band
Samsung Galaxy Smartwatch (46mm) Silver (Bluetooth), SM-R800NZSAXAR - US Version with Warranty
Huawei Watch 2 Sport Smartwatch - Ceramic Bezel - Carbon Black Strap (US Warranty)
Ticwatch S2, Waterproof Smartwatch with Build-in GPS for Outdoor Activities, Wear OS by Google, Compatible with Android and iOS (Midnight)
Fitbit Charge 3 Fitness Activity Tracker, Rose Gold/Blue Grey, One Size (S & L Bands Included)
Fitbit Blaze Smart Fitness Watch, Black, Silver, Small (5.5 - 6.7 inch) (US Version)
Brand
Apple
Samsung
Huawei
TicWatch
Fitbit
Fitbit
Rating
4.8 out of 5 stars
4.1 out of 5 stars
4.1 out of 5 stars
3.8 out of 5 stars
3.2 out of 5 stars
3.6 out of 5 stars
Product Dimensions
40mm, 44mm
1.81 x 1.93 x 0.51 in
1.8 x 0.5 x 1.9 in
2 x 1.8 x 0.5 inches
1.6 x 4 x 8.9 inches
8.6 x 1.7 x 0.4 inches
Weight
30.1g
2.88 ounces
2 ounces
8.6 ounces
4 ounces
1.44 ounces
Best Choice
Preview
Apple Watch Series 4 (GPS, 44mm) - Space Gray Aluminium Case with Black Sport Band
Product Name
Apple Watch Series 4 (GPS, 44mm) - Space Gray Aluminium Case with Black Sport Band
Brand
Apple
Rating
4.8 out of 5 stars
Product Dimensions
40mm, 44mm
Weight
30.1g
See More Details
Preview
Samsung Galaxy Smartwatch (46mm) Silver (Bluetooth), SM-R800NZSAXAR - US Version with Warranty
Product Name
Samsung Galaxy Smartwatch (46mm) Silver (Bluetooth), SM-R800NZSAXAR - US Version with Warranty
Brand
Samsung
Rating
4.1 out of 5 stars
Product Dimensions
1.81 x 1.93 x 0.51 in
Weight
2.88 ounces
See More Details
Preview
Huawei Watch 2 Sport Smartwatch - Ceramic Bezel - Carbon Black Strap (US Warranty)
Product Name
Huawei Watch 2 Sport Smartwatch - Ceramic Bezel - Carbon Black Strap (US Warranty)
Brand
Huawei
Rating
4.1 out of 5 stars
Product Dimensions
1.8 x 0.5 x 1.9 in
Weight
2 ounces
See More Details
Best Price
Preview
Ticwatch S2, Waterproof Smartwatch with Build-in GPS for Outdoor Activities, Wear OS by Google, Compatible with Android and iOS (Midnight)
Product Name
Ticwatch S2, Waterproof Smartwatch with Build-in GPS for Outdoor Activities, Wear OS by Google, Compatible with Android and iOS (Midnight)
Brand
TicWatch
Rating
3.8 out of 5 stars
Product Dimensions
2 x 1.8 x 0.5 inches
Weight
8.6 ounces
See More Details
Preview
Fitbit Charge 3 Fitness Activity Tracker, Rose Gold/Blue Grey, One Size (S & L Bands Included)
Product Name
Fitbit Charge 3 Fitness Activity Tracker, Rose Gold/Blue Grey, One Size (S & L Bands Included)
Brand
Fitbit
Rating
3.2 out of 5 stars
Product Dimensions
1.6 x 4 x 8.9 inches
Weight
4 ounces
See More Details
Preview
Fitbit Blaze Smart Fitness Watch, Black, Silver, Small (5.5 -  6.7 inch) (US Version)
Product Name
Fitbit Blaze Smart Fitness Watch, Black, Silver, Small (5.5 - 6.7 inch) (US Version)
Brand
Fitbit
Rating
3.6 out of 5 stars
Product Dimensions
8.6 x 1.7 x 0.4 inches
Weight
1.44 ounces
See More Details

Want to See All Smart Watches


Apple Watch Series 4 – Best Smartwatch for iPhone


  • OS: watchOS 5
  • Compatibility: iOS
  • Display: 1.78″ OLED
  • Processor: Apple S4
  • Band sizes: Varies based on watch size
  • Onboard storage: 16GB
  • Battery: 1 to 2 days
  • Charging method: Wireless
  • IP rating: Water-resistant to 50m
  • Connectivity: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, NFC, LTE

Coming in a close second, the Apple Watch Series 4 is our second favorite smartwatch you can buy right now. This is the first time Apple has updated the design of its smartwatch line, and it looks all the better for it.

You get a much bigger screen with the choice of 40mm or 44mm watch sizes, there’s a wider display (which is still bright and clear) as well as all the rest of the tech we’ve come to expect from the Apple Watch.

The speaker on this watch is louder than before, the design is still lightweight (yet it feels premium) and you can use all your existing Apple Watch straps with this latest generation too.

Click Here To Get Prices, Reviews and Details

PROS:CONS:
✔ Larger display✖ Battery isn’t amazing
✔ Lightweight design✖ Still pricey

Review Discussion of Verified Purchases:

There are still tons of fitness features and the latest watchOS 5 apps onboard so you’ll likely love this smartwatch. The Apple Watch 4 is our favorite watch you can use with an iPhone (this won’t work with Android devices), but it’s just been pipped to the title of best overall smartwatch.

Read More : Apple Watch Series 4 review


Samsung Galaxy Watch

  • OS: Tizen OS
  • Compatibility: Android, iOS
  • Display: 1.2″ or 1.3″ 360 x 360 Super AMOLED
  • Processor: Dual-core 1.15GHz
  • Band sizes: 22mm or 20mm
  • Onboard storage: 4GB
  • Battery duration: 4 days on 46mm / less on 42mm
  • Charging method: Wireless
  • IP rating: 50m
  • Connectivity: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth

Our best smartwatch you can buy right now is from Samsung, and instead of opting for the expected Gear S4 name it’s called the Galaxy Watch. Following on from the Gear S3 series and the Gear Sport in 2017, the Galaxy Watch is much improved.

We’ve tested out the larger 46mm version of the watch and it comes with a phenomenal four day battery life even when you’re using it extensively. That’s impressive considering a lot of other watches on this list last a day or so from a single charge.

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PROS:CONS:
✔ Long Battery Life✖ The App Market is Slow
✔ 39 Tracking Features✖ Very Little Internal Storage
✔ Good Fitness Features
✔ Samsung Pay Support is Awesome

Review Discussion of verified Purchases:

Two buttons adorn the Galaxy Watch, and while they are on the correct side of the situation, Samsung has sensibly offset them from the typical center location, so they are prone to accidental presses from the bent wrist as on other smartwatches. This is a well-engineered watch  at least during the day.

Read More : Samsung Galaxy Watch review


Skagen Falster Smartwatch


If you’re looking for something a little more feminine, then try the Skagen Falster smartwatch in Rose Gold. Another piece from the Fossil Group, Skagen is a Danish brand known for creating simple timepieces.

The Falster, just like most other smartwatches on this list, is powered by Android Wear 2.0, which includes Google Assistant, smartphone notifications, activity tracking, world time, weather and more.

There’s only one button on the 42mm circular metal case, and you can push it to open Google Assistant or the app drawer. It’s quite springy, and the button’s capability hasn’t worn out during our months of use

Click Here To Get Prices, Reviews and Details

PROS:CONS:
✔ Beautiful minimal design✖ No NFC
✔ Slim, comfortable fit✖ Poor battery life
✔ Interchangeable bands✖ Sluggish performance
✔ Wear OS is simple to operate

Review Discussion of verified Purchases:

This is the tricky part. Like we said, we need to buy smartwatches with our heart. We haven’t stopped using the Falster despite its poor battery life, because we can’t resist it’s gorgeous looks. If you are as mesmerized as we are, then you should get the Falster or at least wait until we’ve tried out the Falster 2. If you don’t think the Falster looks like anything special, then no, this watch is not worth your money.

Read More : Skagen Falster Smartwatch review


Huawei Watch 2 Sport

Huawei tries to cover all use cases with the Watch 2, and while it hits most of them, it doesn’t do it in a way which is overly user-friendly. If anything, it strengthens the case for specialized smartwatches, rather than a one-device-fits-all approach.

Watch 2 has a bright screen and everything runs smoothly and speedily. It’s incredibly comfortable and the look is, if not great, then at least acceptable. It’s unfortunate that Huawei hasn’t included any rotary controls on this, especially as the bezel is a big old thing and as such probably quite easy to grip n twist.

Click Here To Get Prices, Reviews and Details

PROS:CONS:
✔ Built-in GPS and NFC✖ Screen a little too small
✔ Optional 4G model✖ Performance can be sluggish
✔ Feature-packed smartwatch✖ Expensive

Review Discussion of verified Purchases:

One final note we’ll say about the Watch 2, something we’re having trouble putting our fingers on. While the screen is small, the UI cramped, and the fitness tracking poor – we really enjoy wearing the Huawei Watch 2. It’s incredibly comfortable, and just has a certain ‘wearability’ factor that makes us keep coming back to it.

Read More : Huawei Watch 2 Sport review


Mobvoi TicWatch S2

The TicWatch S2 is unpleasant to look at. It’s a watch destined to be worn by those who are unaware of how good a watch can look even smart ones and are content knowing their choice of wrist wear won’t look any worse if it gets a kick in the teeth every now and then.

Mobvoi has chosen the Qualcomm Snapdragon 2100 over the newer Snapdragon 3100 for the S2. Mobvoi told Digital Trends the Snapdragon 3100 is still new and may need more optimization, but the company felt it could do everything it wanted to accomplish with the Wear 2100, while keeping prices low. This echoes Kate Spade’s opinion on not using the 3100 in the Sallop 2 smartwatch. Neither stops us being disappointed the latest processor isn’t inside.

The GPS worked well when we used it on a long walk, and it quickly found and maintained the signal. Using Mobvoi’s TicHealth app on the watch makes it clear when the GPS is active too, with an obvious green arrow icon on the screen. What it doesn’t have is NFC for mobile payments, which is a shame. Mobvoi said it wasn’t a high priority for its customers, and leaving it out helps keep the watches thinner and cheaper.

Click Here To Get Prices, Reviews and Details

PROS:CONS:
✔ Affordable price✖ Not a premium design
✔ Waterproof design✖ No NFC
✔ Two-day battery life✖ Lacks LTE variant

Review Discussion of verified Purchases:

Yes, but just know you could do better in terms of style. The TicWatch S2 is excellent value, with a feature list you simply don’t find elsewhere at this price. It’s just a shame we don’t glance down lovingly at it when we want to check the time.

Read more :Mobvoi TicWatch S2 review


Fitbit Charge 3

The Fitbit Charge 3 is quite the improvement over the Charge 2, but you should only upgrade if you’re after a more slick, lightweight design, a slightly larger display and a few new fitness tracking features.

In August 2018, Fitbit updated its Charge line-up with the third generation device, the Charge 3, offering exercise, sleep and heart rate tracking in a more lightweight design, with a larger display and waterproofing.

But will these upgrades be enough to sway buyers? Its lower price point over its bigger siblings might suggest so, but there’s only one way to find out.

Click Here To Get Prices, Reviews and Details

PROS:CONS:
✔ Bigger screen✖ Still no onboard GPS
✔ Lighter design✖ Monochrome screen
✔ Completely waterproof✖ Proprietary charger

Review Discussion of verified Purchases:

However, this time around Fitbit has ensured the Charge 3 can track your swimming. Although note this is only pool swimming and not open water swimming. More on that later.


TicWatch Pro


The dual-layer screen sips battery and remains a lot more readable at a broader variety of angles and lighting scenarios compared to Wear OS’s usual always on watch faces, and even though I am not going to use Vital Mode frequently, it is wonderful to know that if I got stuck in the wood for a couple weeks, I could switch over to Essential Mode and my opinion would not die on me while I am counting on its step.

The Ticwatch Pro includes a new high-end design and revolutionary dual-screen technology, one of the advantages of this is battery life of weeks instead of times on a Wear OS smartwatch. The watch itself is made from tough nylon together with glass fiber, in addition to the two materials combine to provide a premium look and feel, and solid build quality.

These two buttons are the particular right size and feel tactile as soon as you push them in, so pressing them without looking down at the watch is straightforward.

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PROS:CONS:
✔ Innovative Screen Technology✖ Mediocre Battery in Smart Mode
✔ Premium Design✖ Limited Mobvoi App
✔ Heart-Rate Sensor, NFC, GPS, IP68 Water Resistance.✖ Wear OS is in Need of a Facelift
✔ Heart-Rate Sensor, NFC, GPS, IP68 Water Resistance.✖ No LTE Version

Review Discussion of verified Purchases:

The Ticwatch Pro is among the most interesting smartwatches available on the sector and its dual-screen technology is a really innovative idea that combines the performance of a conventional watch with the advantages of a top-end Wear OS device. Having a mid afternoon price, a premium layout and a great deal of great features, the Ticwatch Guru is among the greatest smartwatches you can purchase.


Fitbit Blaze

The Fitbit Blaze is being marketed as the ultimate smart fitness watch. What that means in layman’s terms is that this is Fitbit’s attempt to create an all-in-one wearable that can offer robust fitness tracking, as well as basic smartwatch functionality. It’s a move that’s been embraced by many wearable manufacturers.

The Blaze looks more like a smartwatch than a fitness tracker. It has a 1.2-inch, detachable 240 x 180-pixel colour screen, metal frame and rubber textured strap. The strap in particular will be familiar to owners of previous Fitbit devices.

For starters, the Blaze isn’t waterproof. It can survive a run in the rain, the odd accidental splash and sweat without issue, but Fitbit recommends that you don’t wear the Blaze in the shower, nor whilst swimming.

Click Here To Get Prices, Reviews and Details

PROS:CONS:
✔ Loe price✖ Lack of notifications
✔ Stunning battery life✖ Strange design
✔ Interesting fitness features✖ Unreactive display

Review Discussion of verified Purchases:

If you’re a casual runner, or someone just getting into exercising, the Fitbit Blaze is a reasonable choice. The FitStar service and social element of the Fitbit app are nice touches that will help newbies start and stick to an exercise regime.


Samsung Gear Sport


Samsung’s most current smartwatch is all about sport, which will come as no surprise when you consider its title. Its design, also, exudes a fitness center with a more sweat-friendly silicone strap and a smaller, lighter structure in comparison with the
preceding Samsung Gear S3. The smaller size is assisted by the fact that there is no built-in LTE connectivity.

However, the Gear Sport is among the strongest fitness devices accessible to connect to a Android smartphone now. It is a no-brainer for Samsung smartphone users that need a do-it-all wearable, and non-Samsung Android consumers should seriously consider the Gear Sport whenever they could deal with using a few more Samsung programs in their smartphone than they may like. Only those that are sticklers for
Google Fit or people who need a bevy of third party programs in their wrists should still go with Android Wear.

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PROS:CONS:
✔ Sleeker Design✖ Shortage of Tizen apps
✔ Accurate GPS/GLONASS✖ No Bluetooth HRMs
✔ Spotify Offline Playback
✔ Vibrant Display

Review Discussion of Verified Purchases:

It does almost precisely what its predecessor does at a slightly sleeker and more water-resistant way but enhances the battery life somewhat. With the older version disappearing from the shelves, this remains a strong Samsung watch… but not much of a step forward.


Fossil Q Venture HR


The Fossil Q Venture HR provides you activity tracking by monitoring your step count and the amount of calories you burn off.

It is possible to set customized goals for yourself including more exercise or activity and drinking more water. This makes it possible to track what is most important to you and motivates you to always reach those goals. Through alarms, you are always going to be up on time and never forget a work-out.

You get some room to leave your phone behind using the Fossil Q Venture HR because it permits you to make payments through Google Pay in almost all areas where it is possible to use a credit card.

Additionally, it has built-in GPS to tell you where you are and where you are going and to monitor your walking or running course.

Moreover, you can save your music on it or control the audio onto your phone’s chosen player (Spotify, Pandora, SoundCloud, Apple Music) so you’ve got your favourite playlists where you go.

Enjoy running a telephone from your watch or giving it voice commands to perform many different tasks as a result of the clarity of this built-in microphone.

With numerous time zones, you can keep an eye on your community time in addition to in a different region of the world. This is a very helpful feature if you keep in touch with a friend or a boss that resides overseas.

It follows that the Venture HR uses GPS to recognize if you have entered another time zone and automatically sets the time and date to this new local time zone –a top-notch feature for frequent travelers.

You have to customize your smartwatch in numerous ways because you can swap your dial to allow it to fit your mood or pick watch faces from Facebook or Instagram photos. You can even change its strap with any 18mm watch strap since it is compatible with them all. As soon as you do, you are going to get notifications to all of your texts, calls, and programs with a gentle buzz which grabs your attention.

Even though the battery life of the Fossil Q Venture HR is not the longest, its charging is super fast so you wouldn’t need to worry about the battery in any respect. In only 1 hour, the battery can reach 80 percent of charge.

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PROS:CONS:
✔ Fast Charging✖ Could be More Compact
✔ Elegant Design✖ Battery Life isn’t Great
✔ Interchangeable Straps

Review Discussion of Verified Purchases:

A slick addition to Fossil’s smartwatch arsenal, the Q Venture HR maxes out on style. Google Pay is user friendly and provides serious value. Meanwhile, its GPS and heart rate monitoring are great for casual runners and base-level dimensions, but we would not currently recommend them as a replacement for a more specialized exercise tracker or jogging watch. Having said that, the Q Venture HR is a good upgrade from its predecessor and, for those searching for a regular, user-friendly smartwatch, is a excellent alternative at a lower cost than competitors like the Apple Watch.